Friday 28 June 2024

Alphonse Mucha and Art Nouveau: 100 years After its Creation, His Work is Still a Balm for a World in Upheaval


By Will Visconti, University of Sydney

Alphonse Mucha’s body of work is full of contradictions.

He is most often identified with late 19th-century Paris, but was in fact Moravian (Czech). His vision for the purpose of art was for the betterment of humanity and creation of utopia, but his most famous artworks are advertisements. His style typifies Art Nouveau, a movement at its peak between the 1890s and 1910s, but his career spanned several decades from the late 1800s until his death in 1939.

Self-portrait with posters for Sarah Bernhardt at Mucha’s studio in rue du Val-de-Grâce, Paris, c1901 © Mucha Trust 2024.

Born in 1860 in what is now the Czech Republic, Mucha trained in Paris. He worked as an illustrator in Paris and Prague, and exhibited work in the Paris Salon before rising to fame with his poster works and branching out into other media. After several visits to the United States, he returned to his homeland in 1910 and remained there until his death in 1939.

A new exhibition of his work at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the largest of its kind seen in Australia with over 200 pieces on display, shows the full breadth of Mucha’s work and his commitment to the transformative power of art across media.

Art and ideals

The twin concerns of Mucha’s art are beauty and identity, specifically, national identity.

This may provide the biggest surprise to viewers who recognise his work, showing the extent of his productivity over so many decades and multiple media. Not only did Mucha compose his iconic posters and design jewellery, but he created murals for Czech municipal buildings and a portfolio of designs for interiors.

Alphonse Mucha, Princess Hyacinth. 1911, colour lithograph 125.5 x 83.5 cm © Mucha Trust 2024.

Significantly, he also designed postage stamps and banknotes in 1918 for the newly-formed Republic of Czechoslovakia.

His work is suffused with his utopian ideals and vision for a better world. For Mucha, art was for all. He believed in the power of art to make the world kinder and more beautiful. Such was the popularity of his posters that people removed them as soon as they were put up, to keep for themselves.

His works define the Art Nouveau (“new art”) style of the late 1800s, full of dynamic natural forms or shapes. The vines and flowers that decorate and frame Mucha’s artworks are also found in art, architecture and interior design.

L Alphonse Mucha, Zodiac. 1896, colour lithograph 65.7 x 48.2cm, The Mucha Collection © Mucha Trust 2024.

To compose these works, Mucha used photographs of models as figure studies, which fill a wall of the exhibition. These photographs include Mucha himself posing with his daughter Jaroslava, a frequent collaborator and artist in her own right.

Celebrity and brand development

After the internationally-renowned actor the “Divine” Sarah Bernhardt, commissioned Mucha for a last-minute poster design, his own celebrity increased. Mucha began work on the poster for Bernhardt’s play, Gismonda, on Boxing Day 1894, and it was ready by New Year’s Day 1895. So began a fruitful relationship between the two.

Sarah Berhhardt posters
Installation view of the Alphonse Mucha: Spirit of Art Nouveau exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, 15 June – 22 September 2024. Photo © Art Gallery of New South Wales, Diana Panuccio

Bernhardt, herself a sculptor, was rendered in larger-than-life sized posters for many of her plays, which convey the drama and tragedy of her performances, including roles as Hamlet and Lorenzo de’ Medici. When Bernhardt saw the Gismonda poster, she declared “You have made me immortal”.

Adjacent to these images conveying the glamour of celebrity and consumerism, the exhibition includes several works that highlight Mucha’s engagement with spirituality, Freemasonry and mysticism.

Alphonse Mucha, Sarah Bernhardt: La Plume art edition poster. 1897, colour lithograph, 69 x 51 cm © Mucha Trust 2024.

A curious juxtaposition in another room shows Mucha’s involvement with advertising alongside his famous rendering of seasons or artforms as allegorical figures. Where series of richly-decorated images show beautiful young women with glistening gold and silver, the largest and most eye-catching work is an advertisement for Nestlé.

By depicting lissom women in a recognisable style, products grabbed attention without necessarily being depicted, as with JOB cigarettes or Moët & Chandon.

Alphonse Mucha, Poster for JOB cigarette papers. 1896, colour lithograph, 66.7 x 46.4 cm © Mucha Trust 2024.

The Slav epic and national pride

Since his teen years, Mucha had a sense of patriotism, expressed first through amateur dramatics and later through his artworks.

This patriotic fervour is best encapsulated in the monumental Slav Epic, 20 canvases tracing pivotal episodes in Slavic history. The work was intended to educate and inspire the Slavic people to build a peaceful future and learn from their past. It is crowned with a golden Christ-like figure to embody the new republic.

Alphonse Mucha, The Slav Epic XX: Apotheosis Slavs for Humanity. 1926 (detail) egg tempera and oil on canvas, 480 x 405 cm © Mucha Trust 2024.

Given the fragility of the Slav Epic works to travel beyond their current home in the town of Moravský Krumlov, the Art Gallery of New South Wales instead provides digital projections set to music.

It offers a chance to experience the grandeur of the works, the richness of the colours and imagery, all treated with Mucha’s eye for detail.

Mucha with the Slav Epic canvases as exhibited in the Klementinum, Prague, 1919 © Mucha Trust 2024.

A final display shows both the links to Japanese art in Mucha’s works and the broader taste for Japonisme during the late 1800s. The same influence is seen beyond this exhibition in Toulouse-Lautrec’s posters, with their use of flowing black lines or a limited palette. There are also manga, showing the legacy of Mucha’s artworks now reflected back in Japanese art and album covers. Groups like The Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane reproduced or appropriated Mucha posters, drawing on their iconic status and melding it with a psychedelic sensibility.

Alphonse Mucha, The Flowers: Carnation. 1898, colour lithograph on paper,107.5 x 47 cm. © Mucha Trust 2024

This exhibition offers more than just beautiful things. It provide the viewer with a glimpse of art that uplifts, and a balm for a world in upheaval, as it did 100 years ago.

Alphonse Mucha: Spirit of Art Nouveau is at the Art Gallery of New South Wales until September 22.The Conversation

Will Visconti, Teaching staff, Art History, University of Sydney

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.

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Tuesday 18 June 2024

Paris Fashion Week: Revolution and Rebellion ~ Kidill’s Punk Futurism at the Expiatory Chapel

One of Kidill's punk and otherworldly designs from the new collection in Paris. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

In the heart of Paris, the Expiatory Chapel was an evocative backdrop for the latest spectacle by Kidill. This historic monument, located in the 8th arrondissement, is a poignant symbol of commemoration and reverence, making it an unexpected stage for the Japanese label's Spring/Summer 2025 collection. This juxtaposition of history and avant-garde fashion encapsulates the brand's essence: merging tradition with radical contemporary expression, writes Antonio Visconti. Photographs by Elli Ioannou 
 

The chapel looms in its neo-classical 
elegance above the gardens and tombs 
of the Swiss Guards in Paris.

THE Expiatory Chapel, nestled in the Madeleine district within the Louis XVI square, carries deep historical significance. Constructed between 1815 and 1826, it honors the victims of the French Revolution, particularly the royal couple, King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. 

Classified as a historic monument since 1914, the chapel's solemn architecture and lush garden set the scene for Kidill's bold and rebellious presentation, creating a compelling narrative that intertwined the past with the future. Hiroaki Sueyasu, the creative director behind Kidill, drew inspiration for this collection from a unique source: his creative exchange with the musical duo Ho99o9. 

The band's intense energy and distinctive style profoundly influenced Sueyasu. This marks the first time he has crafted a collection directly inspired by individuals, signaling a new direction in his creative journey. The Japanese designer was captivated by the Tokyo vibe emanating from Ho99o9, blending this with the eclectic street style of Harajuku, particularly the whimsical "Lolita" fashion. This fusion of punk and Lolita styles is evident throughout the collection, showcasing a dynamic interplay between dark, edgy elements and playful, intricate details. 

The chapel's solemn architecture and lush garden set the scene for Kidill's bold and rebellious presentation, creating a compelling narrative that intertwined the past with the future

Punk futurism melded with
streetwear inspired by Tokyo
The SS25 collection features 30 hand-crafted looks that encapsulate Kidill's signature punk aesthetic while pushing the boundaries of conventional fashion. Deconstructed pieces from vintage metal band t-shirts highlight the collection, reflecting Sueyasu's admiration for DIY culture and the raw, unrefined beauty it represents. 

The inclusion of a shoulder bag with tattered and eroded fabrics adds a tactile dimension to the collection, evoking a sense of history and wear. Sleeveless suit jackets and vintage suit pants, created by skilled tailors, juxtapose the roughness of deconstructed elements with the precision of traditional craftsmanship. This blend of old and new, chaos and order, is a testament to Sueyasu's innovative approach to fashion design. 

 A notable highlight of the collection is the collaboration with Umbro, which brings a sporty edge to Kidill's punk-inspired pieces. Track jackets and game shirts, reimagined with the label's distinctive flair, merge athletic wear with high fashion. This partnership not only broadens the appeal of the collection but also reinforces the brand's ethos of breaking down barriers and challenging norms. 

Sueyasu's collection is also rich with symbolic details that enhance its narrative depth. The myriad of zippers and padlock fastenings, sleeveless denim vests, and the symbolic use of laces all contribute to a cohesive aesthetic that embodies the spirit of customization and individuality. These elements, influenced by Ho99o9's stage costumes and personal style, infuse the collection with a sense of authenticity and rebellion. 

This blend of old and new, chaos and order, is a testament to Sueyasu's innovative approach to fashion design, rich with symbolic details that enhance its narrative depth.

Ho99o9 is the inspiration
for Sueyasu;s latest collection 
The influence of artist Kae Tanaka is evident in the graphics and embroideries that adorn several pieces in the collection. Tanaka's work, characterized by its intricate and thought-provoking designs, complements Kidill's avant-garde aesthetic. This artistic collaboration adds another layer of complexity to the collection, highlighting the intersection of fashion and art. 

A recurring motif in the collection is the code "999," which holds a special significance for both Sueyasu and Ho99o9. This number, an inversion of the number 666, symbolizes a new stage of evolution and boundless possibilities. 

It represents a progressive mysticism that aligns with the current state of mind of Sueyasu, embodying a sense of hopeful defiance and forward-thinking. 

Ho99o9's eclectic blend of digital hardcore, punk, and trap-infused hip hop has carved a unique niche in the music world. Their volatile sound, which incorporates elements of industrial, metal, and noise, mirrors the abrasive and irreverent aesthetic of  the Japanese brand. The duo's lyrics often address human emotions, societal issues, and political realities, resonating with the themes explored in Sueyasu's fashion. 

The SS25 collection is a bold declaration of punk futurism and radical contemporary design that challenges conventions and celebrates individuality

Harajuku style meets the Lolita
motif in the designs
The ongoing collaboration between them exemplifies the synergy between fashion and music, illustrating how these creative realms can influence and elevate each other. This relationship, which began almost two years ago, has culminated in a collection that is both a tribute to and an evolution of punk culture. 

The SS25 collection, presented within the hallowed grounds of the Expiatory Chapel, is a bold declaration of punk futurism. By blending historical reverence with radical contemporary design, Sueyasu has crafted a collection that challenges conventions and celebrates individuality. 

The collaboration with Ho99o9 and the incorporation of diverse influences underscore Kidill's commitment to pushing the boundaries of fashion. 

 As the models paraded through the chapel gardens past the tombs of the Swiss Guards, the juxtaposition of past and present became a powerful visual metaphor. It was a reminder that fashion, much like history, is an ever-evolving narrative.

Scroll down or tap pictures to see highlights form Kidill's SS25 show in Paris 
















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Monday 17 June 2024

Pharaoh at the NGV is the Greatest Exhibition of Ancient Egyptian Art Ever Seen in Australia

Dr Marie Vandenbeusch, Curator: Funerary Culture of the Nile Valley, British Museum in the 2024 Melbourne Winter Masterpieces® exhibition Pharaoh, a collaboration between the British Museum and the NGV, on display from 14 June – 6 October 2024 at NGV International, Melbourne. Photograph: Eugene Hyland


By Sasha Grishin, Australian National University

There have been many exhibitions of ancient Egyptian art held in Australia. Pharaoh, at the National Gallery of Victoria, is outstanding for its scope, scale and presentation.

It is the greatest exhibition of ancient Egyptian art we have ever seen in Australia.

The exhibition comes from the British Museum, holder of the largest and most comprehensive collection of Egyptian antiquities outside the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Over 500 items have been selected, including monumental sculptures, tomb and temple architecture, coffins, papyri, funerary objects and an extensive display of jewellery.

Numerically, this is the largest (and heaviest) touring exhibition ever mounted by the British Museum and it is the largest exhibition of ancient Egyptian art ever shown in Australia. The effective dramatic display, designed by Peter King who treats the whole space as a cycle from dawn to dusk, occupies all of the major downstairs exhibition spaces at NGV International.

The functionality of art

For a civilisation that left such a huge artistic heritage, it is sobering to remember the ancient Egyptian language had no word for “art”.

Art was something functional that gave permanence to the objects of this world, so they could continue to serve their owners in the next life. Much of the surviving ancient Egyptian art is tomb art, designed to withstand the test of time and to preserve in an idealised form the beauty of balance, order and harmony, while celebrating the absolute power of the pharaoh.

A scarab
Ornament depicting the throne name of King Senusret II Egypt, possibly Thebes 12th Dynasty, reign of Senusret II, about 1880–1874 BCE. Electrum, lapis lazuli, cornelian, feldspar. British Museum, London © The Trustees of the British Museum

What is it about ancient Egyptian art that holds us spellbound? In part, it is the sense of sublime beauty, its permanence, with forms seemingly unchanging over millennia, its antiquity and its state of preservation. More than anything else it is the fact that it is permeated by a sense of magic, somehow meant to overcome the forces of death.

When a person died, they were mummified and engaged in a ritual involving an interaction with the “ka” (life force) and the “ba” (human essence). They were surrounded by what we could think of as art objects that involved magic spells, magic amulets and protective deities.

A sandstone pharaoh.
Statue of Pharaoh Sety II wearing emblems marking his royal status. Egypt, Thebes, Karnak, temple of Mut 19th Dynasty, reign of Sety II, about 1200– 1194 BCE. Sandstone. British Museum, London © The Trustees of the British Museum

What struck me about this exhibition was this sense of spirituality – the mystical otherness. We are presented with a variety of beautiful objects across seven thematic categories. Each section, in a way, comments on the role of the pharaoh in Egyptian life.

The elaborate and the intimate

In an exhibition of this nature, there are a number of memorable objects: the granodiorite Head of a colossal statue, probably King Amenemhat III; the life-size sandstone seated Statue of Pharaoh Sety II wearing emblems marking his royal status; the monumental red granite Statue of a lion erected by Pharaoh Amenhotep III, reinscribed by Pharaoh Tutankhamun; the limestone Statue of future Pharaoh Horemheb and his wife; the huge painted limestone Relief showing King Mentuhotep II wearing the red crown; and the imposing monumental limestone sculpture of the Statue of Ramses II as a high-priest.

A red lion
Statue of a lion. Originally Sudan, Soleb; later Sudan, Gebel Barkal 18th Dynasty, reign of Amenhotep III, about 1390–1352 BCE. Red granite. British Museum, London © The Trustees of the British Museum

All of these are huge works with a dominating presence, a marked frontality and a sense of permanence.

What intrigued me were some of the more intimate, immensely elaborate jewellery-like pieces that served as seals, rings, plaques, amulets, pendants, beads and earrings.

These include: the ornament of a winged Scarab holding a sun-disc, depicting the throne name of King Senusret II with its pieces of lapis lazuli; the faience Throwstick of Pharaoh Akhenaten – an ancient Egyptian boomerang; Girdle with amulets, beads and pendants made of electrum, silver, lapis lazuli, feldspar, amethyst, cornelian, glass; and the Ornament with a bull’s head on a gold mount decorated with uraei and lotus flowers made of gold with the bull’s head carved into a piece of lapis lazuli.

A blue throwing stick.
Throwstick of Pharaoh Akhenaten. Egypt, Amarna, Royal Tomb 18th Dynasty, reign of Amenhotep IV/ Akhenaten, about 1352–1336 BCE faience. British Museum, London © The Trustees of the British Museum

While one may be seduced by the ornamental design, the exquisite craftsmanship and precious materials, there is also something ethereal about these objects of beauty.

They were intended to ward off evil spirits and beg for their owner’s smooth transition into eternal life, where the person could experience life in their present form but free of pain, illness or hardship.

3,000 years of art

The Book of the Dead (more accurately translated as the “Book of Coming Forth by Day”) was a collection of magic spells intended to assist a deceased person’s journey through the underworld. The texts were prepared for a specific person and speak of the needs of a particular individual.

Ancient scroll.
Sheet from the Abbott Papyrus. Egypt, Thebes late 20th Dynasty, reign of Ramses IX, about 1110 BCE. Papyrus. British Museum, London © The Trustees of the British Museum

Since I was a child, I loved reading this book as it was the voice of an ancient Egyptian speaking directly to me.

One passage reads:

There is no sin in my body. I have not spoken that which is not true knowingly, nor have I done anything with a false heart. Grant you that I may be like to those favoured ones who are in your following, and that I may be an Osiris greatly favoured of the beautiful god.

This beautiful and significant exhibition traces the art of ancient Egypt for 3,000 years from the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt and the beginnings of the Old Kingdom with the development of hieroglyphs, in about 3000 BCE, through to the Roman conquest.

A solemn divine majesty runs throughout this exhibition as it celebrates the eternal and magical power of art.

Pharaoh is at the National Gallery of Victoria until October 6.The Conversation

Sasha Grishin, Adjunct Professor of Art History, Australian National University

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Monday 10 June 2024

The Best Highlights of Streetstyle at Paris Haute Couture Week Spring/Summer 2024

Striking a pose for the streetstyle photographers at Schiaparelli in Paris.Photograph by Andrea Heinsohn. Cover picture of American actor Bella Thorne by Elli Ioannou for DAM 

We look back at more highlights of streetstyle captured by the DAM team at Paris Haute Couture Week Spring/Summer 2024. During those winter days, the fashion drama was not just confined to the storied salons and grand venues where design houses such as Schiaparelli, Chanel, Dior, and more recent couturiers like Rahl Mishra, unveiled their latest collections. 

Outside, the streets of Paris were transformed into an impromptu runway, where fashion enthusiasts and celebrities showcased their personal style, creating a spectacle that rivaled the catwalks inside. Guests included Zendaya, Da'Vine Joy Randolph, Jennifer Lopez and Bella Thorne. Even Valentina Ferragni, the younger sister of Chiara was present in the French Capital, despite her elder sibling being embroiled in a maelstrom of controversy in Italy. Photographs by Elli Ioannou and Andrea Heinsohn

Scroll down to see more highlights from the Streetstyle at Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024 
 Bella Thorne holds her swashbuckling hat outside the Schiaparelli couture show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024.Photograph: EllI Ioannou


Zendaya wearing a custom Schiaparelli gown designed by Daniel Roseberry at the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: EllI Ioannou

Jennifer Lopez is mobbed by crowds as she attends the Schiaparelli show wearing a petal encrusted look in all white with Daniel Roseberry's Surrealist glasses. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph; Elli Ioannou


Schiaparelli from head-to-toe outside the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Like a brilliant bird of paradise, wearing Rahul Mishra outside the show in the 9th arrondissment. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

American actor Hunter Schafer is photographed before she attends the Schiaparelli show. aris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 

The scrum of photographers jostle for a good spot to capture the arriving guests at the Schiaparelli show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn  




Natalia Vodianova in a cream ensemble and accessories by Schiaparelli before the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Black, white, silver and gold at Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 




Antoine Arnault and Natalia Vodianova on the way to the Dior show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Arrivals for the Schiaparelli show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 

Barely wearing Schiaparelli at the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Zendaya arriving at the Schiaparelli show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 

Cheeky! At the Schiaparelli show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Valentina Ferragni in cream Schiaparelli including jewellery and handbag. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Photographers gather to shoot the most eye-catching arrivals at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Mid-century chic at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

A splash of tomato red Schiaparelli suiting amid a sea of black and white. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 

Chains, skirts, trousers, jacket, colourful clutch, ready for Chanel. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou



Caroline Daur in Schiaparelli before the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou




A burgundy overcoat brightens all black photography pack at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Quirky, individual style strikes an appealing note amid some of the overstyled 'slebs. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou 

In the streets of the 9th arrondissment before the Rahul Mishra show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 


A panoply of Chanel pieces outside the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Leonie Hanne on the way to Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 


Bare legs in a Paris winter? Marianne ? in the street outside the Rahul Mishra show wearing the Indian designer's sequined creation. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn
Stylish in Daniel Roseberry's creations for Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou



Scintillating red drapery and gold accoutrements at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Another freezing summer dress in the midst of a Paris winter. At the Schiaparelli show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 

Jordan Roth with his signature exuberant style at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Looking warm and cosy before the Rahul Mishra show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Susie Lau aka Susie Bubble at Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

A dramatic reveal at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 

A young adopter of Chanel outside the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Comfort and style at Chanel. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 


Chanel devotees outside the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Sleek streetstyle on the way to Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Carla Bruni arrives at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 
A cute Chanel clutch stands out against at vibrant tweed. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

A statement coat on the way to Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Black velvet and ready for a streetstyle close up at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Anna Dello Russo on the way in the rain to Chanel. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 

A flash of Elsa Schiaparelli's shocking pink at Daniel Roseberry's show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Looks like summer but it's a winter's day before the Rahul Mishra show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Chanel by name and Chanel by nature, outside the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Parisian rain at Chanel, Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

A trend that always look like a key piece of clothing is missing. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Black and white is the directional look this season. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn 

Sabrina Dhowre Elba at the Schiaparelli show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Chanel flair outside the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

A peaked cap, short jacket and jeans at Chanel. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Elli at work at the Schiaparelli show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Engulfed by Schiaparelli black with the gilded measuring tape edge. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Milliner extraordinaire Stephen Jones at the Schiaparelli show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Guests outside the Schiaparelli show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Before the Chanel show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Freezing winters day but summer dress at Dior, Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Dashes of blue captured in the street on the way to Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Houndstooth elegance at Dior. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

A tan and bare shoulders with a corseted creation at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

The intricate beadwork, a signature of Rahul Mishra. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Hunter Schafer also braves the cold in a strapless Schiaparelli velvet dress. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph; Elli Ioannou

Marianne Fonseca in a sculptural, ruffled confection by Rahul Mishra. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Iridescent Chanel before the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Chic black cape outside the Rahul Mishra show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Fluid simplicity on the way to Dior. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Sequined, silver tiger outside Rahul Mishra. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

On the steps of Schiaparelli in a full Daniel Roseberry look. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Voluminous red coat looks dramatic on the way to Dior. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Mixed, subtle patterns in shades of charcoal at Chanel. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

All black never looked so good, seen at Dior. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Velvet coat and long boots going to Dior. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Dior details, lace tights and tulle. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn




On the steps of Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Gold embroidered ensemble and Chupa Chup at Rahul Mishra. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Black transparency and boots.Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Bare shoulders and a faux fur hat outside Rahul Mishra. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Blue velvet and gold shoes at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Anna Dello Russo in a Daniel Roseberry long coat at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Elli Ioannou

Da'Vine Joy Randolph arrives at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Hand-embroidered ensemble by Rahul Mishra. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

Simple and stylish at Schiaparelli. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn

The Surrealist face that relaucnhed Schiaparelli, on the way to the show. Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2024. Photograph: Andrea Heinsohn













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